The Essentials Of An Effective Logo

Your company’s logo is its first impression, a chance to give prospective consumers insight into your business. According to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Sloan Marketing Review, brand logos can become a “synthesizer” of your brand, used by customers to form positive connections while fostering a distinctive opinion. Design is crucial to the success of your logo. Matthew Hale, of the design firm Lippencort, states that “a company’s logo is its shorthand, a visual cue that tells a story of the brand’s culture, behavior, and values.”

Have Character
A logo must inspire an image, a story. Ralph Lauren, world-renowned fashion and lifestyle brand, exudes chic living steeped in American tradition. The iconic Polo Horsemen logo vocalizes this way of life. Polo, a sport of high society, embodies wealth. The logo is active in design, simple in execution, and encompasses the values of the Ralph Lauren brand. The character of your logo creates a connection of meaning with your business.

Be Different
Your brand is defined by the simple truth and value of your business. According to Bloomberg, 80% of new businesses fail within their first 18 months. Eric Wagner of Forbes states that a company’s downfall comes down to “a lack of market differentiation and the inability to convey the value of the business in an eye-catching, unique fashion.” Your logo’s design must stand out, stand tall, and separate your company from the pack. Differentiation will lead to brand recall in the minds of your consumer. You have a unique vision. Let the world see it too.

Embrace Artistry
A logo’s design must be unique but not necessarily complex. Simple, clean choices are often best. For a logo’s ability to translate between color schemes and mediums allows your company to make its mark. Nike’s iconic swoosh is the most recognized sportswear logo in the world. The design prompts emotion and motivates performance. The swoosh navigates from shoes to clothing, and posters to accessories through its associated character and simplicity. The quickness, the sharpness, and the precision of sports are all aesthetic qualities of the “Swoosh.”

A successful design is dependent upon the logo’s ability to act as a form of advertising in and of itself. Gearing your logo to the trends and popular imagery of the time does little in the long run. Be timeless. Logos with true staying power are ones with tangible identity and emotion.

When the Austin Chamber of Commerce looked to redefine what they stood for, they came to Screamer Co. The Chamber desired an overhaul of their logo. One that reflected their change in culture, evolution as a brand, and advocating for their ability to navigate the hectic nature of a major city’s market. The logo was to hit on three major qualities of the Chamber: connection, impact, and prosperity. Through the implementation of circles and curves, the redesigned logo possessed an aurora of approachability and a chance for business owners to connect and coordinate with the Chamber. The upward trending graph centered on the Chamber’s commitment to progressive action and a positive impact in Austin. The logo’s bright coloration provided energy and a feeling of freshness. Where many government and corporate institutions implement mundane blues, Screamer wanted to give the Chamber a unique identity, befitting of Austin’s quirky qualities. The redesign of the Commerce logo is both creative and meaningful. The logo conveys the Chamber’s sharpness while emphasizing the opportunities abound in Austin through its clever “A” design.

A logo is one of the most powerful tools in your marketing arsenal. For those armed with care and implemented with precision, it can mean the difference between staying power and fleeting success. Take your company from a business to an iconic brand.

 

Sources:
Feloni, Richard. “What Makes Logos the Best Logos so Good.” Businessinsider.com. Business Insider, 11 Apr. 2014. Web. 6 Jan. 2015. <http://www.businessinsider.com/what-makes-the-best-logos-so-good-2014-4>.

Lidwell, William. “The Science of Logo Design.” Lynda.com. 30 Apr. 2014. Web.

Whan Park, C., and Andreas Eisingerich. “The Power of a Good Logo.” MIT Sloan Management Review. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 22 Oct. 2013. Web. 7 Jan. 2015.

Wagner, Eric. “Five Reasons 8 out of 10 Businesses Fail.” Forbes.com. 12 Sept. 2013. Web. <http://www.forbes.com/sites/ericwagner/2013/09/12/five-reasons-8-out-of-10-businesses-fail/>.

Is your logo effective? Click the button below to download the Logo Equation and see for yourself.
Recent Posts